Fruity Herbal Ice Pop Recipes [Video]

    Written by: Renee Long /
    Jul 4, 2016 7:00:00 AM

    Ice Pop copy.jpg

    Fruity Herbal Ice Pop Recipes [Video]

    By Renee Long and Tiffany Stout 

    As the temperature spikes and the sun stays out late into the evening, our herbal gardens ripen and we know summer has made its long-awaited return.

    With the heat of summer comes the temptation for icy sweet treats; synthetically flavored ice cream, slushies, Italian ice, and other sugary products abound. But while you “chill out,” it’s nice to have yummy, healthy, holistic alternatives to the sugary temptations of summer.

    Enter fruity herbal ice pops! These refreshing icy delights are made entirely from natural herbs and fresh, seasonal fruit. We wanted to add a bit of creamy goodness to a few of the recipes, so you’ll see some of them include unsweetened Greek yogurt. The best part: since there are so few ingredients, you can feel good about handing these out to the kids at the Independence Day picnic. No sugar crash necessary. 

    In our video, we show you how to make a basic fruity herbal ice pop recipe. The rest of this blog post has six more refreshing ice pop recipes for you to try. Enjoy! 

     

     

    A few notes before you start blending: Each recipe makes ice pop filling for six, 2.5-ounce pops. If you don’t have ice pop molds, just add the filling to small cups, cover with a layer of plastic wrap, and pierce sticks through the plastic wrap… and voilà! Homemade ice pop molds.

    Creamy Blueberry Basil Ice Pop

    Blueberries: 2 cups

    Unsweetened Greek yogurt: 2 cups

    Basil Ocimum basilicum (fresh): about 5 leaves, or add to taste

    Salt: A pinch

    Blend ingredients until smooth. Add filling to ice pop molds. Freeze overnight. When ready to serve, run ice pop mold under warm water for easy removal.

    Creamy Strawberry Basil Ice Pop

    Strawberries: 2 cups

    Unsweetened Greek yogurt: 2 cups

    Basil Ocimum basilicum (fresh): about 5 leaves, or add to taste

    Salt: A pinch

    Blend ingredients until smooth. Add filling to ice pop molds. Freeze overnight. When ready to serve, run ice pop mold under warm water for easy removal.

    Creamy Lavender Chamomile Honey Ice Pop

    Lavender Lavandula angustifolia and chamomile Matricaria recutita infusion: 1½ cups

    Unsweetened Greek yogurt: 2 cups

    Honey: Two tablespoons

    Lavender Lavandula angustifolia flowers dried: A pinch 

    To make a lavender/chamomile infusion, place 1½ tablespoons of herb in a ceramic or glass teapot. Pour 1½ cups of boiling water over the herb, and steep for 10 minutes.

    Allow the infusion to cool before adding yogurt. Blend ingredients until smooth. Add filling to ice pop molds. Freeze overnight. When ready to serve, run ice pop mold under warm water for easy removal.

    NOTE: Do not use honey with infants younger than one year old as there have been reports of botulism spores in honey and this can be fatal in infants.

    Cherry Marion Berry Mint Ice Pop – AKA “Charionberry”

    Cherries (pitted): 2 cups

    Marion berries: 2 cups

    Mint Mentha spp. dried (we chose spearmint): 1-2 tablespoons 

    Blend ingredients until smooth. Add filling to ice pop molds. Freeze overnight. When ready to serve, run ice pop mold under warm water for easy removal.

    Alternatively, you can make a mint infusion rather than adding mint directly into the mixture. See directions for infusion above.

    Mango Cayenne Ice Pop

    Mango: 3 cups

    Filtered water: ½ cup

    Strawberry: 3 medium-sized berries

    Cayenne pepper: ½ teaspoon 

    Blend ingredients until smooth. Add filling to ice pop molds. Freeze overnight. When ready to serve, run ice pop mold under warm water for easy removal.

    Strawberry Mint Ice Pop

    Strawberries: 3 cups

    Filtered water: ½ cup

    Mint Mentha spp. dried (we chose spearmint Mentha spicata): 1-2 tablespoons 

    Blend ingredients until smooth. Add filling to ice pop molds. Freeze overnight. When ready to serve, run ice pop mold under warm water for easy removal.

    Alternatively, you can make a mint infusion rather than adding mint directly into the mixture. See directions for infusion above.

     

    What herbal/fruit combinations will you try? Tell us in the comments!

    Holiday Gifts

    This article is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent disease. This article has not been reviewed by the FDA. Always consult with your primary care physician or naturopathic doctor before making any significant changes to your health and wellness routine. 

    Disclosure of Material Connection: We are employees for American College of Healthcare Sciences, the Institution that publishes this blog. However, all opinions are our own. This blog may contain affiliate links. We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”  

    Authored by Renee Long

    Renee is a creative writer and the content development manager for ACHS. She holds an MFA from Florida Atlantic University. She loves finding new ways to communicate and tell stories, and she enjoys writing about holistic methods that can bring others wholeness and total healing. Her perfect day would include her loved-ones around a campfire on the beach, a warm mug of tea, and her journal.

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