Our Relationship with the Earth We Live On | achs.edu

    Written by: Kimberly Konkol /
    Jan 31, 2019 6:56:00 AM
    kimberly konkol with flowers

     

    Flowers and people need many of the same requirements to be healthy. Both need water to live, require many of the same nutrients such as calcium, potassium, and magnesium, while both have need of sunshine for photosynthesis. In plants, photosynthesis creates sugars and starches by the conversion of carbon dioxide and water using the sun's energy. People obtain vitamin D through photosynthesis. Vitamin D is synthesized in the skin through a photosynthetic reaction triggered by exposure to sunshine.1

    chamomile flowersA connection with the earth's energy may also be something both flowers and people need for optimal health. Scientific research is showing how important connecting to the earth is for our health. Connecting to the earth helps the body to function properly by reuniting it with the natural electrical energy from the earth. Research is also showing a connection between chronic inflammation and chronic diseases. Grounding the body acts as an antioxidant by allowing the negatively charged electrons from the earth to enter the body and neutralize the positively charged free radicals where there is inflammation. Being disconnected from the earth by our modern lifestyle may be contributing to an increase in chronic illnesses. Research has shown earthing helps our health in many ways:2

    • reducing pain
    • osteoporosis
    • sleep improvement
    • stress reduction
    • reduces blood viscosity
    • thyroid function
    • immune response

    It has also been shown that connecting to the earth for only one hour helps restore blood flow regulation in the face, indicating enhanced skin tissue repair. This exciting research shows the possibility that earthing may improve the health and appearance of the skin.3

    earthingHave we lost our electrical roots? The soles of our feet have a rich supply of nerve endings that help keep us in touch with the earth's electrical energy. They also have a large amount of sweat glands. This moisture helps the electrons flow from the earth into the body. Every living thing absorbs this energy on the surface of the earth through its feet, paws, and roots. In our modern world we are insulated from these electrons by our buildings and synthetic shoes. Besides direct physical contact you can also connect with the earth's electrons through a conductive system while sleeping, working, and relaxing.

    Many experiments have been done on “Earthing” plants. Dr. Gary Schwartz, Ph.D., from the University of Arizona, conducted a study where the grounded cut sunflowers lived 10 days longer than the ungrounded ones. The grounded sunflowers were connected to the earth's energy which allowed them to live out their life cycle. The water in the ungrounded flower's vases turned cloudy and dark while the grounded flower's water remained clear.4

    We are living like cut flowers. Earth's energy is there any time you want it. Just take off your shoes while walking on the beach, in the grass, or working in your garden. Reconnecting our roots to the earth can help us bloom from the inside out -  like a beautiful flower.

    “Earthing the body may be essential for health along with sunshine, clean air and water, nutritious food and physical activity.”1

    Author's Note:

    konkol-avatar

    Flowers are a passion of mine, as well as healthy living. The more I learn about flowers, the more my love for them grows. There are so many ways our lives benefit from flowers everyday. Flowers not only bring us joy with their brilliant beauty, they also have an incredible impact on our well-being in an enormous amount of ways. I received my training at ACHS, and as a Wellness and Holistic Nutrition Consultant, and also the owner of Everlasting Love of Flowers, I am excited to share my inspiration from flowers and the many ways they help us bloom. You can visit my blog on my website at www.everlastingloveofflowers.com

    Learn more about our degrees

    References:

    1. Holick, M.F. (1987). Photosynthesis of vitamin D in the skin: effect of environmental and lifestyle variables. Federation Proceedings, 46(5), 1876-82. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3030826
    1. Chevalier, G., Sinatra, S., Oschman, J.I., Sokal, K., Sokal, P. (2012). Earthing: Health implications of reconnecting the human body to the earth's surface electrons. Journal of Environmental and Public Health, 1-8. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3265077/
    1. Chevalier, G. (2014). Grounding the human body improves facial blood flow regulation: results of a randomized, placebo controlled pilot study. Journal of Cosmetics, Dermatological Sciences and Applications, 4, 293-308. Retrieved from https://file.scirp.org/pdf/JCDSA_2014111211461709.pdf 
    1. Xanthos, G., (2011). The global phenomenon of “earthing”. Going Organic Guide. Retrieved from https://issuu.com/earthing/docs/earthing_gog

    Authored by Kimberly Konkol

    Kimberly Konkol graduated with honors from ACHS in 2015 with Certificates in Wellness Consulting and Holistic Nutrition Consulting. Currently, Kim owns and operates a dried flower farm and design business, Everlasting Love of Flowers, where she designs dried flower displays as well as focuses on the medicinal and nutritive properties of flowers. She created the blog LIFE IN BLOOM, to share wellness information in a positive and uplifting way that she hopes will inspire others.

    Request Information About Our Programs:

    Subscribe to Email Updates

    Popular Posts